Facts Regarding Disinfectants

TRUSTED FACTS ABOUT THE USE OF DISINFECTANTS

Using the correct disinfectant is an important part of preventing and reducing the spread of illnesses along with other critical aspects such as hand washing.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has informed consumers with a list of disinfectants that people can use to protect themselves from the novel coronavirus.

Here are some of the registered disinfectants on the EPA's list:

Clorox Multi Surface Cleaner + Bleach

Clorox Disinfecting Wipes

Clorox Commercial Solutions® Clorox® Disinfecting Spray

Lysol brand Heavy-Duty Cleaner Disinfectant Concentrate

Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist

Lysol brand Clean & Fresh Multi-Surface Cleaner

Purell Professional Surface Disinfectant Wipes

Sani-Prime Germicidal Spray

You can read the full list of disinfectants here.

You can find the full list of disinfectants in EPA’s website.

Current list of products that meet EPA’s criteria for use against the Coronavirus-COVID-19

List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2

Other COVID-19 Resources

List N includes products that meet EPA’s criteria for use against SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19.

When purchasing a product, check if its EPA registration number is included on this list. If it is, you have a match and the product can be used against SARS-CoV-2. You can find this number on the product label – just look for the EPA Reg. No. These products may be marketed and sold under different brand names, but if they have the same EPA registration number, they are the same product.

This list includes products with emerging viral pathogen claims and those with human coronavirus claims. If a product with an emerging viral pathogen claim is not available, use a product with a coronavirus claim. If the product is listed as “N” under the Emerging Viral Pathogen Claim column, then it has a human coronavirus claim.

Important Note:

Handwashing with soap and water is still the best way to prevent transmission of the virus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's because from what we know so far, the novel coronavirus is thought to spread primarily by people and their respiratory droplets -- think coughs, sneezes, spit.

In other words, person-to-person transmission is most common.

While it's possible that people who touch surfaces or objects contaminated with the virus and then touch their mouths or eyes can also become infected, this may not be the main way the virus spreads, the CDC said. So disinfectant wipes can only go so far.

Clean and disinfect:

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

You can find the complete disinfectants guidance here.

CDC Handwashing Guidance:

CDC recommends washing hands with soap and water whenever possible because handwashing reduces the amounts of all types of germs and chemicals on hands. But if soap and water are not available, using a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol can help you avoid getting sick and spreading germs to others.

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.